Can Speech Recognition Help Children Learn to Read? ​

A primer on the applications, risks and aspirations of speech recognition technology in the classroom.​

This new white paper discusses how speech recognition is gaining momentum as a curriculum and assessment tool and shares insights from education thought leaders across the K-12 landscape including:
  • Sean Ryan, President, McGraw Hill School Group
  • Dan Cogan-Drew, Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer at Newsela
  • Larry Berger, Founder and CEO, Amplify Education
  • Jennifer Carolan, Founder of Reach Capital
  • Krista Curran, SVP at Amplify
  • Sara DeWitt, VP of PBS Kids Digital 
  • Yolie Flores, National Campaign Director for Parent Nation
  • Sunil Gunderia, Chief Strategy Officer for Age of Learning
  • Dylan Arena, VP of Learning Science at McGraw Hill Education
  • Kai-leé Berke, Co-Founder of Noni Educational Solutions
  • Michael Levine, SVP of Learning and Impact for Noggin
  • Ralph R. Smith, Managing Director, Campaign for Grade Level Reading
  • Sean Ryan, President, McGraw Hill School Group

  • Dan Cogan-Drew, Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer at Newsela

  • Larry Berger, Founder and CEO, Amplify Education

  • Jennifer Carolan, Founder of Reach Capital

  • Krista Curran, SVP at Amplify

  • Sara DeWitt, VP of PBS Kids Digital

  • Yolie Flores, National Campaign Director for Parent Nation

  • Sunil Gunderia, Chief Strategy Officer for Age of Learning

  • Dylan Arena, VP of Learning Science at McGraw Hill Education

  • Kai-Lee Burke, Co-Founder of Noni Educational Solutions

  • Michael Levine, SVP of Learning and Impact for Noggin

  • Ralph R. Smith, Managing Director, Campaign for Grade Level Reading

 

“The primary determinant of mass adoption [of speech recognition] is trust, built one experience at a time, over time. I see this accelerating as teachers witness the time savings and, more importantly, gain deeper insight and drive positive student outcomes.”


Sean Ryan,
President, McGraw Hill School Group

The whitepaper discusses:

The evolution of speech recognition in education.

Why speech recognition built for adults won’t work for kids.

How voice-powered learning tools work: use cases and potential new applications.

Why voice data is so valuable for teachers.

The risks associated with inaccurate and biased voice-powered learning tools.

“There's real interpersonal stress for a student who has difficulty reading and is reading to another person. In some cases, it's really much better that you're reading to a machine than a human, because the machine passes no judgment. It just says, ‘This is what I heard you say.’”


Dan Cogan-Drew,
Co-Founder and Chief Academic Officer at Newsela