The UK’s new design code for protecting kids’ online privacy hits all the right notes: transparency, parental consent, data sharing and misuse, default privacy settings and age appropriate settings.

And while the code itself is not legally binding, it’s backed up by data protection laws that can be enforced through fines and trade sanctions.

COO Martyn Farrows reacted to the new design code by explaining how SoapBox Labs sees kids’ privacy :

“SoapBox Labs’ privacy-by-design approach to technology and data goes all the way back to our founding in 2013. From the very beginning, we wanted to invest in processes that protected kids’ rights. It wasn’t faster, and it certainly wasn’t cheaper, but it was the right thing to do for us as a kid focused company and a business with long term, global ambitions”.

We continue to be active in advocating for kids’ digital rights and recently collaborated on a paper with anthropologist Dr. Veronica Barassi in response to a request for submissions from the UN’s Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

It’s now 7 years since SoapBox Labs committed to a privacy-by-design approach to kids’ voice data. Here’s hoping that other technology companies, large and small, will realize that the time has come to commit to them also.

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